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About

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Jamaal Barber is a creative imaginative soul who was born in Virginia and raised in Littleton, North Carolina. At a young age he was fascinated by the aesthetic images and vivid illustrations in children’s books and comic books. He soon started creating images of his own on the back of his textbooks in elementary school and on any other material that he could find. He finally answered the call to become an artist after reading about the legacy and life of Romare Bearden in high school.

In 2013, after seeing a screen printing demo at a local art store, Jamaal started experimenting with printmaking and made it his primary focus. His fine art can be seen on display at the ZuCot Gallery. It has also been included in the Decatur Arts Festival, Atlanta Print Biennial Show and at various art shows around the Metro Atlanta area. Additionally, Jamaal has done print work for Black Art in America and Emory University.

In 2004, Jamaal moved to Atlanta, GA where he now resides with his wife and two children. 

Artist Statement:

My art makes social commentary about black life and black identity. I explore all aspects of black life in America from the nostalgic reverence of small town, southern life to the societal forces that shape modern urban life across the country. My work features black figures as the main characters in the narratives.  Kerry James Marshall often talks about there being a power in seeing the black figure as stars where they are not often seen.  Figures in my art are carved and printed in relief with added layers of texture by screen printing patterns and colors to support the narratives. My aim is to create a new kind of propaganda to spread messages that speak to all aspects of black life.